Robot Profiles

2019 (FIRST Deep Space):

Valkyrie

 

Elevator:

3 stage, two 775 Pro gearbox, continuous rigging

 

Hatch:
Spring-loaded hooks hold onto hatch from the center. Pneumatics release it once the hatch is stuck to the velcro on the Rocket or Cargo Ship 

 

Cargo:
Simple horizontal roller intakes the Cargo and holds it in place to be scored. Pneumatics hold the mechanism within the frame perimeter at the start of the match.

Arm:

350 : 1 775 pro gear ratio that flips our arm in one second.  Uses a combination of gears and Pulleys to keep a compact and light profile.

Drive:

Utilizes four Neo Motors and a six wheel tank drive

Climber

Two pneumatics and one Neo powered a lift that allowed us to climb to both level two and three.

   

2018 (FIRST PowerUp):

Mjolnir

 

Shooter:

Linear “puncher” (more like a slingshot) gearbox w/ reg cim 54:1* Wench back plate & launch cube 

 

Cube Intake:
Verticle roller intake w/ compliant wheels 

 

Arm:
Has puncher and intake 
653:1 ratio 

Drive:

6 wheel drop center tank drive

4” colsons

Omni wheels 

Custom gear box 9.69:110.52 ft/sec

Autonomous:

Crossed the auto line

Consistently scored on switch

 

2017 (FIRST Steamworks):

Ragnarok

 

Shooter:

Turreted shooter with 180 degrees of motion

Triple flywheel

 

Ball Intake:

Roller powered by a 775 VEXPro motor

Stored in a 40 ball  hopper

 

Shooter Intake:

Intakes balls from hopper with mecanum intake

Rails guide balls to shooter

Drive:

6 wheel drop center tank drive

6” colsons

Inverted CIM dog shifter

Low gear: 7.84 ft/s

High gear: 16.8 ft/s

 

Autonomous:

Place gear on any peg

Sensors

Banner sensor on gear intake

Encoder on gearboxes

2016 (FIRST Stronghold): 

Loki

 

Shooter/Intake:

Powered by two 775 VEXPro motors

Free speed of 8300 rpm on 3.5" Colson wheels

Polycord multi-positional intake

Pivoting shooter to shoot in low and high goals

 

Drive:

6 8" inch pneumatic wheel West Coast Drive

6 CIMs

Top speed: 5.7 ft/sec (low gear), 20.9 ft/sec (high gear)

VEX 2-speed ballshifting transmission

Can cross all defenses except C category defenses

 

Autonomous:

Cross B or D category defenses or low bar

Capable of shooting in either low or high goal

 

Sensors:

Banner sensor to detect when a boulder is secured

Encoders on shooter wheels to control boulder speed

Magnetic encoders to track the angle of the arms and automatically position arms/intake at desired angles

2014 (Aerial Assist): 

Freyja

 

Ball Intake and Ballista:

JVN Style with BAG motor and 3" wheels to grab the ball

6 bands of elastic Latex tubing

Launches the ball up to a speed of 30 ft/sec

Scores from a distance of 20 ft

 

Drive:

6 wheel West Coast Drive chassis/drive system

3 CIM Ball Shifters w/ 3.68 spread

Yields 4.17:1 (21 ft/sec) and 15.32:1 (5.8 ft/sec)

Custom electrical board

 

Autonomous:

Move forward into blue/red zone

Shoots one to two balls into the high goal

 

Shooting and Assisting:

Intake in reverse can assist and score into the low goal

Ballista has capability of getting the ball over the truss as well as scoring in the high goal

2015 (Recycle Rush): 

Heimdall

 

Drive:

Mechanim drive w/ 4 cim motors

Four 6'' wheels

Autonomous:

Can grabber auto

Lift & Scoring Mechanism:

Elevator system

Hay squeezer with tabs

Can grabber mechanism

2013 (Ultimate Ascent): 

Beowulf

 

Frisbee Intake and Battle Axe Shooter:

Battle axes allow arm to rotate upward clockwise and counterclockwise up to around 150 degrees

Shooter powered by mini CIMs connected to two 6-inch wheels

Pneumatics stopper prevents Frisbee from going into shooter until ready

Shooter also guided by timing belts and chain

 

Drive:

VexPro 3-stage ball shifters with 2.27 spread

Four CIMs

6-inch wheels with drop middle that robot easily drives over Frisbees

Top speed from 5 ft/sec in low gear to 11.4 ft/sec in high gear

 

Autonomous:

Raise arm to peak high and shoot four frisbees from any corner of the pyramid

 

Shooting and End Game:

Can make shots from 25 feet away

Hangs on to first level of the pyramid by "Rex" arms

2012 (Rebound Rumble):

Odin

 

Ball Intake and Shooting:

Two FP motors coupled to 6-inch wheel that stores up to two balls

Uses velocity PID and high-speed encoder for shooting

 

Drive:

Two-speed modified super shifters (16 ft/sec or 4 ft/sec)

Four CIMs

West Coast Drive train with center wheel drop

 

Hybrid and End Game:

Shoots two balls in the top hoop

Puts down the ramp

Balances by itself within 5 seconds

Balances with another robot within 20 seconds

Balances with 2 other robots by using stacking configuration capable of supportying another robot

Can bring down and lift the bridge

One of only two stackerbots in the world in 2012

2003 (Stack Attack):

Xcorpion

 

Hey! I'm known as XCORPION and I am the third robot Team 701 has constructed, made for the 2002-2003 season. I am well-known for my unique shape and am probably the most unique robot that Team 701 has constructed so far. (I also have a pretty cool name.)

     In the 2002-03 season, FIRST released the game Stack Attack. The game started with a 15 second autonomous period, in which robots could "attack" a stack of 45 Rubbermaid Storage Bins on top of a 12 foot wide ramp that was made out of 1" wire mesh. Robots had to push bins into their scoring area for points and then stack them if they wanted to multiply their points (awesome deal!). Bonus points for this game were awarded for robots that were on top of the ramp at the end of the match. Some of my features included a four wheel drive system that used 2 drill motors and transmissions. I had a "bin grabber" claw powered by a single 2" air cylinder. I also had a 3-segmented arm for grabbing and stacking bins. I was powered by Fisher-Price motors at my base, Window motors at my elbow, and a Globe motor at my wrist. My claw grabbed bins and was powered by a 3/4" air cylinder.  My design was my best feature (not to brag) but it was! I looked so much like a scorpion. That's probably why I am the most unique robot constructed so far by our team. That year I attended the Silicon Valley, Los Angeles, and international competitions with my team of 9 students. I didn't make it past eliminations in any of those competitions. It was disappointing, but I was still appreciative of my abilities. Winning isn't everything I told myself, and I just performed to the best of my ability all the way.